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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 499 (some duplicates have been removed)
the economy on both sides of the debate, and felt that it wanted to try my hand at clarifying it. i felt like i needed to make my contribution as best i could, because i done that at bain capital and felt like i need to try something different and it and i had to try to do something that was important. >> host: you mentioned of bain capital. there's a lot of interesting ideas and thoughts in this book. maybe you could tell me where these ideas come from. i these ideas that are developed over a long time from your career in finance? who are your influences in how you think about the economy and what's in the book? >> guest: they probably, it evolves from debates i had with young kids that came out of top schools, came to work for first been consulted and bain capital who wanted to argue economics and politics, and i can't think when you get to be 40 or 45, and i think it evolves from that. but i also benefited greatly from a friendship i had with bruce who is a professor at columbia who i was able to make the arguments to any would frankly say you're right on this but you're stepping on a land
and little optimism. >> the world economy recovery continues, but it has weakened further. in advanced economies, growth is now too little to make a substantial dent in unemployment. >> reporter: colleagues cut their forecasts for growth worldwide to 3.3% this year. the recovery has suffered new setbacks, they wrote. and uncertainty weighs heavily on the outlook. >> you can call it a general feeling of uncertainty about the future. worries about the ability of european policy makers that control the euro crisis. there are worries about the failure of u.s. policy makers to agree so far on a fiscal plan. >> reporter: he ran through a list of challenges in developed countries. government spending cuts, a weak financial system, high unemployment. emerging economies such as china drove the recovery from the global downturn, but they have cooled off. >> clearly the downside if the global economy were to slow much more than expected, then additional policy measures will be needed. >> reporter: he said he was encouraged by the easy money policies of many banks and pieces to what he called a co
a key issue the presidential campaign as the economy continues to falter. >> this country doesn't succeed when only the rich get richer. we succeed when the middle class gets bigger. >> rose: joseph stiglitz is a nobel prize winning economist. in his new book the price of inequality, how today's divided society endangers our future. he argues that a wealthy minority in this country has fed a vicious circle of growing inequality. i'm pleased to have joe stiglitz back at this table. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> rose: where do you think the american economy is today? and is it trending upwards? >> it's not really trending upward. i guess i would describe it as part of-- i call it a long slump, long malaise unless we do something. >> rose: right. >> you know there are two big gaps in our economy, relative to say 2007 before the crisis. one is real estate. real estate was the big sector, the bubble broke and now real-estate investment is half of what it was. no way that that is going to recover soon. the only good news is the houses were shodly onstructed and it may be 5 or 10 yea
're in a very slow economy. so i think that in this particular third-quarter earnings period the chance of a good surprise, a meaningful good surprise or a meaningful disappointment, it's pretty low. the street expects poor earnings comparison. that is what we're going to get. whether you are a couple percent decline or a couple percent gain. it's really not that much different. so it's looking ahead. remember earnings are a trailing indicator. >> so are we going to get a surprise or a disappointment you think from alcoa. everybody looks at this as setting thtone for trading as you mentioned. it will be the first dow component to report. it also when you look at the company, it has businesses in autos, aerospace, packaging, construction, so it is kind of a bellwether for the economy. what will those alcoa earnings tell us. >> well, alcoa reports first all the time, obviously. and i don't think that is a good idea to use that as a bellwether for earnings. think of the sector that alcoa is in. materials are going to have some was comparisons, really, energy and materials are going to be t
and seems clear two battles tonight. one is over the state e of the economy right now. obama is going to say that he has made a lot of progress bute basically going to ask for mor. time to finish the job. t the romney camp says this is where their guy is going to be tough on obama's record in the economy over the last four years and he will say barack obama made a lot of promises in 2008 and hasn't kept the promises. they don't worry about their are guy being likeable and say the key is to stay on offense. the other battle over the plans for the next four years where o obama will be tough on romney and say this is a guy who wants to give tax cuts to the wealthc and to voucherrize medicare. romney will say he is the defender of the middle class. t both sides say this could get heated tonight. >> chris, thank you. >> good evening. >> we go to jim lehrer of pbs moderating this debate. >> i'm jim lehrer and welcome you to the first of the 2012l presidential debates between president barack obama the democratic nominee and former, massachusetts governor mitt romney the republican nominee. this de
at the end of the day. when the economy is much less strong as is the case today, they don't do that. they have no need to do that. there is nothing more potent as a driver of education for those with less skill than a taught labor market and the need to hire. i would suggest to you that those who assert that slow growth and stimulus and what happens in the short run is the short run issue, what is most important is the concept of long run fundamentalss this the crucial point -- miss the crucial point. we are by allowing the economy remains stagnant committing grievous structural sins. we are squandering human capital as people withdraw from the labour force. we are missing opportunities for employment and training for workers in their most formative years. we are running an active set of measures that discourage investment in finding the most disadvantaged workers and we are providing limitations on the incentive to invests in research and development as a product of tomorrow. how then to think about our current situation and the strategy for moving forward? it is i think right to s
, but happy saturday. are we closer to fixing this economy before it is too late? some recent signs of recovery say yes. unemployment down the 7.8%, and that the lowest rate since president obama took office. claims for first time unemployment benefits fell to levels not seen since 2008, and some technical details going on there, but the trend is clear. and real estate collapse got us into the mess, but now the housing prices are timely starting to rise. i will say it again, housing prices are starting to rise and foreclosures fell to five-year lows last month. so how do we make sure that the economy really heals? two different philosophies and one being very big election coming up to fix it. president obama says thathe businesses need the tax incentives to create more jobs, and he says that the government needs to step in and the government needs toinvest in programs now that can pay off later. manufacturing, green energy, instra trui inf infrastructure and aid for state and local governments. mitt romney says to get the government out of the way. and former new york times columnis
expect. and, we'll get inside the brainstorming session of politicians who hope to revive the economy. what to watch in the stock market ahead of tonight's vice presidential debates. plus, will oscar buzz surrounding a new movie help put it at the top of the box office heap? and are traders hopping in the costco shopping cart? first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning. it's thursday, october 11th. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: debate night as vice presidential candidates joe biden and paul ryan square off in primetime. yesteday turned into another downer for the market. alcoa and chevron weighed heavily on the dow. gold ended the session flat and oil dipped by nearly a dollar. and the winter heating outlook is in. following last year's warm winter, some americans will get a sticker shock this year, especially those using heating oil. those bills are projected to rise 20%. lately the hot market has been cooling off. phillip streible of rjo futures joins us. good morning to you. what's your
is beginning to court the global economy throh e sale ofydroeltric power. geof its indigenous tions wd its natural environment. the mekong river traces an 1,100-mile path through or along the border of laos. the river has also been a barrier between laos and its neighbors. now there is a road, where before there was none. in 1994, the friendship bridge gave laos its first land link with the outside world, through thailand to the west. the bridge may symbolize a connected future, but laos in the here and now remains among the poorest countries in the world. ( rooster crows ) it is the least developed country in the lower mekong basin. life expectancy is low, about 53 years. ( rooster crows % of cn e ourished. the potential changes brought by economic development are enormous. the soil here is rich and fertile. laos remains a largely agrarian society. lowland peoples practice wet rice farming. the capital, vientiane, has a population of just half a million. the rest of the 5½ million laotians are spread over 155 million square miles of land. it'she sonlowestpulaon dena aand the least urbani
saying they're slowing down but a hard landing. stabilizing around here helping out the world economy tremendously but in my opinion still remains to be seen. i am not quite sure, china will hold 7.5% level. sandra: charlie, you see reason to play defense into the upcoming election. in fact, you say there is a way to say if romney wins or if president obama wins. what would that exactly be if there was various outcomes to the election, obviously? >> i think the chances are that capital i believe pretty much on strike for most of this year is going to see the potential for better economy, the first year of any administration doesn't tend to be that good of a year for the market or the economy. the market would definitely see the possibility to come off the sideline in the later part of next year into 2014. your previous guest talking about how a win for obama pretty much has been discounted, but if you see it, it'll be capital sitting on its hands for the next four years. david: if in fact obama wins the election, fiscal cliff is resolved, therefore you think all this cash, we are seei
what one expert thinks. >> susie: american consumers are feeling pretty good about the economy. the university of michigan's latest reading on consumer sentiment hit a five-year high. that comes as the treasury reports the u.s. budget deficit topped $1 trillion in fiscal 2012. that's our fourth-largest budget deficit since world war two. that held wall street's gains in check: the dow rose 2.5 points, the nasdaq fell five. the s&p down four. for the week, the major averages were all off more than 2%. the nasdaq was hit the worst, down almost 3%. giov >> i think it's very hard to predict real estate prices now because the world is in such an unusual situation. there are so many ifs. and because we just recovered from the biggest housing bubble in u.s. history. so we're really in uncharted territory right now. >> reporter: shiller says one problem for the housing market is there is really no sense of urgency for potential home buyers to pull the trigger on a purchase. interest rates are expected to remain low for the foreseeable future and housing prices really aren't rising that
on the part of our members. >> she repeated her view that the global economy continues to recover, but she said the pace is slower than expected. what she called a veil of uncertainty covers various parts of the world. so she's urging policymakers in europe to act now. legarde encouraged them to follow through with plans to create a banking union. then she turned her attention to the friction between japan and south korea over territorial issues. she's calling on leaders from both countries now to patch up their relationship. she said it's critical for asian economies and for the global economy. japan of course locked in another territorial dispute with china. some chinese delegates as we know have stayed away from these meetings. legarde said they're missing out on a great opportunity. she says she hopes the problems between the two however long-standing could be resolved. the head of the world bank says the uncertainties in countries that we've been talking about are leading people in developing nations more vulnerable. kim jung in says it's making things worse. >> increasing food prices
in infrastructure, if we level the playing field, we will grow the economy. frankly, we have a ball and chain. it is congress. congress is holding us back. we need to change congress in two ways. we people who are more fiscally responsible. when the people who know the basics of how to work together. you will hear these things a lot tonight in my comments. i was the governor who drew top tax fraud. i had to cut $5 billion from the state budget, including my own salary. i'm the only governor in modern times who left the office with a smaller general fund budget and when i started. i know how to be fiscally responsible. my opponent when into the united states senate in 2001 with the biggest surplus in the united states and six years later left with massive deficits. during his time in the senate, the national debt went up by $16,000. he conceded that spending was a problem in the senate. we also have people who need to know how to work together. i learned to cut crime bills and the economy. my opponent said his job was to not democrats softly. he took this similar position in the senate, fighti
economic recovery continues, but it has weakened further. in advanced economies growth is now too low to make a substantial dent in unemployment. >> reporter: chief economist olivier blanchard outlined factors that are pulling down growth in developing economies, including budget restructuring and a weak banking system. he says is crisis in the eurozone remains the most obvious threat to the global outlook. now, he projected the region's economy will shrink by 0.4%. contrast that with the forecast for emerging markets and developing countries, that coming in at 5.3% growth. but blanchard and his colleagues see the downsides even in that figure. they've revised china's growth down 0.2 percentage points from three months ago, india's down 1.3 points. they forecast an increase of 2.2% in both japan and the united states. and they do predict, as well, stronger growth worldwide next year at 3.6%. blanchard said figuring these things out can make for a complex puzzle. i had the chance to speak with him earlier about what pieces need to fall into place. does seem the recovery is losing a bit
the global economy. some of the world's leading economic minds have gathered at the tokyo international tor forum for the annual meeting of the international monetary fund and world bank. nhk's ron madison is there and will be there all week. i was hoping you could break this down for us. what's going on there? >> reporter: there's lots going on. already been a very full morning. lots of people here. we have finance ministers, central bank governors and other officials from 188 member nations all here now to really, you know, try to agree on how to deal with the problems that they share. and as you point out, they do have quite a few of them. of course, we've got the debt crisis in europe. but also another factor is the slowing growth in china. also, political problems on the horizon in the united states as well as other places. now, the economists from the imf have answered some of our questions with their world economic outlook. we'll have the details of that coming up in just a few minutes. now, also finance ministers and central bankers from the group of 7 nations will be meeting to dis
, how would you describe the jobs economy and right now? guest: this is the weakest recovery we have had since world war ii. the jobs numbers each month, we have averaged around 145,000 jobs created per month this year. that is barely enough to keep up with the growth of the working age population. and it has been a somewhat brazilian recovery in that there have been a lot of fears that we would go back into recession at various times and that has not happened. the overall economy has grown roughly 2% since the recession ended in june, 2009. that is a fairly weak growth rate, particularly after the death of the recession. by many measures, this is easily the worst since the great depression corporate -- the great depression. the modest and sometimes weak growth we have had has made it very difficult for the unemployed. we have long-term unemployed, those are of work for six months or even a year, that has been a record -- at record levels. ben bernanke has long term crashes -- the prices of long- term unemployment. -- the crisis of long-term unemployment. host: let's begin with a call fr
in the global economy to 3.3% in 2012. that forecast also downgraded to 3.6% for 2013. of course there are two topics weighing heavily on the 15,000 can delegates. one is the global slowdown and the second is the crisis in the eurozone. i asked the chief economist at the fund about whether or not spain needs a bailout. >> at this stage the interest rates that they face are low. the question is are the interest rates low because investors expect spain to ask for a program, in which case spain will have to ask for one, or are they low because spain is doing all the right things and investors are not worried. so spain, if you look at what they're doing, they're taking all kinds of fiscal measure which is are courageous. so they're doing the right thing no question. >> also noticeable in this economic outlook is the downgrade in the forecasts to some of the key emerging economies. for example brazil and india. the fund says brazil's economy will grow at a slower pace than the united states and lowered outlook to below 5%. i had a chance to speak about you who he feels the indian economy was shapin
credit problems around the slow down of emerging economies. there will be donor countries and the meeting to discuss the arab spring popular movement. an international conference is slated for sundai. imf representatives are starting off a week of announcements by releasing their global economic outlook. they are lored forecast by 0.2%age points to 3.3% the the report says economic decline is serious in southern economic countries. it also points out the european uncertainty is slowing growth in emerging nations such as china. the report projects the euro zone will shrink. japan and the united states should see 2.2% growth. global growth will increase to 3.3% next year but they warn europe's credit problems still pose a threat to the global economy. the bank's latest report project 7.2% growth across 14 countries. that's lower than the forecast in may. the region includes china but not japan. china's domestic demand is sluggish and it's hurt exports throughout the region. growth in east asia will rise to 7.6% next year. they say china will pick up steam and demand will grow within southea
cuts and tax increases will drive down the u.s. economy over what's called the fiscal cliff. central bankers from the u.s. and elsewhere explained how they were using additional monetary easing to curb their common problems. the ministers and governors didn't emerge with any official statements or even give signs of further coordinated action. they said something they've said before -- they'll keep working on it. reiko sakurai, nhk world, tokyo. >>> the head of the imf is asking those around her to draw on the spirit of their hosts. l christine lagarde says she's impressed by the resilience japanese showed as they worked to recover from last year's disaster. she's calling on leaders to share that sense of cooperation. >> we expect action, and we expect courageous and cooperative action on the part of our members. >> lagarde says she and her colleagues unwhat needs to be done. she's urging banking supervisors to complete the job of rewriting the rules of finance. government leaders need to tackle what she calls a legacy of high debt. lagarde says they should focus on getting people, p
into the economy they are 12i78ity-- stimulating housing. citi has problem relating to housing. they are stimulating emerging markets where citi is the strongest. >> all right, let's take a look at some of your other picks besides citi. you like goldman sachs. you have been telling us this all year. and the regional bank suntrust. again, was's the attraction? >> suntrust again is in the southet. it has continuedto have credit problems later than a lot of the other banks. but that's been a bad thingment but now we think it's a good thing. because right now we can still see a lot of positive improvements as we start to see a pick up in the economy and housing and places like florida, can help move that stock back up. so we still like suntrust. >> we just have about 45$p)-sec. a new round of bank stress tests coming up. how do you think banks are going to do. are they strong enough to withstand a financial downturn? >> well, i think they're strong enough. the question is does the fed think they're strongnough. and that is what we will find out. i think it will be a tough time peri
's the world economy and the u.s. economy. the imf cited two reasons things could get worse, first if european lead s fail to support their ailing economies and second if leaders here in the united states let us plunge over the fiscal cliff. the imf sister organization, the world bank citing the same two factors, cut its growth forecast for asia this week as well. now, that's for the next couple of years. where are we going to be in 2016, four years from now, when we're discussing the next u.s. election? that depends on which of these two roads america takes on election day. i'll take you down both paths on this show starting with what 2016 will look like under a president mitt romney. start with jobs. he says 12 million jobs will be created in the next four years. as i keep telling you, that claim it ridiculous, considering the sluggish growth we're seeing right now and the new downward revision. but for the purposes of this exercise, i'll take him at his word and presume an historic surge in jobs lies ahead. let's talk about taxes next. i'm going to let governor romney explain this for himse
zakaria. welcome from all over. i'm fareed zakaria. the state economy. i was the topic of this week's presidential debate and be d deciding week of the election. we're often told we need to get businesses to start investsing and hiring. well, we have three powerhouse ceos on the show. lloyd blankfein, and john of cisco systems. next, 11 years after 9/11, do we have to worry about al qaeda again? i'll talk to the former cia chief michael hayden about the aftermath of the benghazi attack. >>> and on his decade in hiding after a threat was placed on his life. >>> also, if china's growth slows, should the rest of us cheer? no. >>> first, here's my take. the pundit dees claired mitt romney the winner. he was. obama seemed passive, detached, and glum. but what's more significant than how romney said things is what he said. romney repeatedly insisted he was not advocating a big tax kuchlt in fact, he declared unequivocally that he would not cut taxes at all if they added to the deficit at all. now, as "the washington post" reporter checks out, for two years rom hi has been campaigning on a
. that promise is rapidly slipping away because our economy is on the wrong track. 170,000 people woke up in our state this morning without a job. we can get our economy back on track if we get our people back to work. i have a plan to do that. i have been there. i've been bankrupt. i've lost everything and i have been able to come back. that's what we need a -- that's what we need to do. the plans my opponent has support in washington has only made things worse. you can look it a path for someone who has created millions of jobs or you can look at the path for someone who's going to push the economy of the fiscal cliff. >> thank you very much and thank you to channel three. i'm looking forward to this morning. i am a product of connecticut possible class. my grandfather worked in the factories of new britain, my mother is a retired schoolteacher. i was raised to believe i need to live my life in a way to stand up for the bill class families of the state that has meant so much to my family. i passed the connecticut stem cell law which is saving lives and putting people to work. i went to congres
is the first dow component to report earnings, and is considered a bellwether of how the economy is faring. the stock barely budged in the regular session, closing at $9.13 a share, and was up a few pennies after hours. we're happy to have with us now alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld. >> welcome back to nightly business report. baseed on how alcoa did in the third quarter, how do you think business will be for you for the rest of this year and going into 2013? >> well, it's a miktsed word out there. there's a lot of volatility. we see in the end markets that we confirm, the aluminum market is going to be about growth six percent. we took is down a notch from seven percent. as you just said, this is a decade where aluminum demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commerc
. 1457 -- 1456. our next guest is making a staggering call. he says the world economy may be down for the count. that prognosis by brookings called tiger standing for tracking indice for global economic recovery. political conflict, lack of fiscal decision-making are two of the key reasons for the dire warning. >> how does this factor into the market? in today's "closing bell exchange," cornell university professor and senior fellow at brookings, which authored that very study. also with us are savita from merrill lynch. very strong language in the report, global economic recovery hits the ropes but you do make the point that the u.s. certainly looks better than everyone else. so, the key question is, can the u.s. avoid catching the world's cold? >> that's a literal statement. the u.s. looks better than other xhis in the world but it's not a great spot to be in. with the amount of policy and political uncertainty, the u.s. -- even the u.s. recovery staying strong is certainly not a sure thing. they'll be buffeted by headwinds from abroad because china and india are not doing well.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 499 (some duplicates have been removed)